Welcome to the East County Integrated Transit Study Online Open House Results!

Through the study, we worked to identify solutions for improving transit service between Brentwood and Antioch. This has been a two-year study funded through a Caltrans grant.

Map of study area in Antioch, Brentwood, and Oakley, including state route 4, park and rides, existing and proposed transit stations, bus route, and Tri Delta Transit service area
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Person sitting on a bench, facing web page text, gesturing, and discussing transit in East County

Study mission

Understanding our core goals

We want to provide seamless travel options for our residents, commuters and visitors – people like you. We are developing solutions that are sustainable, smart, user-friendly, and efficient.

Person sitting on a bench facing web page text, reading about transit in East County

Study goals

4 people using a wheelchair a bike & walking at transit station talking about time, modes, transfers & parking

Improve rider experience 


2 people talking about the benefits of transit represented by images of an electric bus, flowers, & crosswalk

Communicate the benefits of transit


A transit station with diverse communities, including wheelchair guide dog & bike users, many ages ancestry & genders

Respond to equitable access needs


A transit station with more and more people popping up, walking, rolling, working, shopping & living near the station

Support economic development


A transit connection map with Antioch eBART station future transit employment housing electric buses trains & people

Allow for future, innovative transit options


Benefits of active & public transit instead of only driving, such as air quality improvement, next to image of traffic & smog

Improve air quality

How we engaged communities in East County

We gathered community feedback through two online open houses that ran from October 13, 2020 to February 15, 2021 and August 13 – September 27, 2021 that included a total of three surveys. Combined, the two online open houses — which were available in 108 languages via Google Translate — collected responses from 325 people.

The survey in the first online open house was focused on understanding mobility needs and alignment with the study goals and framework. The second online open house was focused on understanding community preferences through one survey about the study alternatives and another about the importance of factors for decision making.

We also gathered community, stakeholder, and technical feedback from the study Steering Committee and Technical Advisory Committee about our strategies for engagement, online open houses, community-based organization communication, and social media sharing. 

Person walking with guide dog

What we heard from communities in East County overall

The online open house surveys asked respondents about the factors influencing their use of public transit, their level of satisfaction as transit riders, their support of draft alternatives developed for the study, and their overall comments.

People want to drive less

As people considered their ideal travel options for the future, responses showed increased interest in taking the train, walking, jogging, or running with or without assistance, using a bike or scooter, using a personal motorcycle, moped or scooter, taking a private bus or shuttle, vanpooling, using a carshare service, or using Paratransit. Responses showed a noticeable decrease in interest in driving alone and using Uber, Lyft, or app-based ridesharing services as a single passenger.

Rail, travel time savings, and transfers are most important

Compatability with a potential future rail extension, travel time savings, and the number and ease of transfers were deemed very important by over 80% of participants.

High support for all transit alternatives

All six proposed alternatives received high levels of support – each alternative was supported by at least 50% of participants in the Round 2 online open house. Alternatives 2 through 6 were supported by 50-53.1% of participatns.

  • Alternative 1, which would extend BART commuter rail service in the State Route 4 (SR-4) median from the future Innovation Center @ Brentwood Station to the existing Antioch Station, had the highest level of support at 83%.
  • Alternative 6, a rapid bus on Slatten Ranch Road from the future Innovation Center @ Brentwood Station to the existing Antioch Station, had the second highest level of support at 53.1%.
  • Alternative 3, a dedicated bus rapid transit in the SR-4 median from the future Innovation Center @ Brentwood Station to the existing Pittsburg / Bay Point Station, had the third highest level of support at 52.9%.

Open-ended comments

The word cloud above presents the results of the comment forms on the surveys. Common responses included passenger preferences about safety, prices, seamless transfers, access to retail, housing, and micro mobility options, and amenities; connections to specific places; preferences for BART and rail due to perception of faster and cheaper service; and connections between different transit providers.

Where do we go from here?

The next step is to review recommendations from the detailed evaluation results, and approve the locally preferred alternative, which follows the process shown below.

An infographic showing the decision making timeline to get from draft alternatives to the locally preferred alternative(s), including the following steps:
    •	Steering & Technical Advisory committees consider community input and to make recommendations about the locally preferred alternative(s) on November 8, 2021.
    •	TRANSPLAN considers community input and provide recommendations to the CCTA board on the locally preferred alternative(s) on November 17, 2021. 
    •	The Planning Commission considers community input and provides feedback on the locally preferred alternative(s) 
    December 1, 2021.
    •	CCTA Board reviews and considers community input and approves all final recommendations on the locally preferred alternative(s) on December 15, 2021.
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Following selection, the study will begin conceptual design of the locally preferred alternative to refine the assumptions and identify critical details for further study. This will all be summarized in the final study report, which will be completed by the end of February 2022 and shared on CCTA’s website.

What happens after the study is done?

CCTA, in collaboration with East County public agencies, will begin the process of identifying and securing funding for the preferred project.

graphic of person entering a bus

Deeper dive into Round 1 engagement

The Round 1 online open house ran from October 13, 2020 – February 15, 2021. We used this input to guide the engagement for Round 2. Nearly 90% of Round 1 respondents indicated they live in East County. View and/or print the Round 1 online open house archive PDF here.

We learned the following from East County residents like you.

This feedback was used to influence elements of the alternatives, such as onboard transit and station amenities, and transfers. Check out the Round 1 engagement Summary here for more details.

graphic of person entering a bus

Deeper dive into Round 2 engagement

During the Round 2 engagement, we hosted an online open house to survey East County communities about the alternatives and evaluation criteria. Participants were able to indicate their level of support for each proposed alternative. This feedback influenced the scores for the Community Support metric. Participants’ input regarding the importance of each evaluation criterion/metric determined how strongly each criterion factored into the evaluation of alternatives. View and/or print the round 2 engagement summary PDF here and the round 2 online open house archive PDF here.

graphic of person entering a bus

How do the alternatives compare to each other when it comes to meeting the goals of the study?

In the graphic below, the study alternatives are listed with a thumbs up, down, or up and down to indicate mixed ratings against the study goals, which are listed as the bold column headers. This performance is determined by the technical team through modeling and weighted based on feedback from the community, stakeholder, governmental, and teering / technical advisory committee members (as described above).

Alternative 1: BART in Median from Brentwood to Antioch, is listed first since it leads not only in community preference (as shown above), but also in terms of performance against the goals of the study and from a technical perspective (below).

The goal categories include user experience, equitable access, improve air quality, economic development, flexible expansion, and communicate benefits and tradeoffs. 
    •	Alternative 1: BART in Median from Brentwood to Antioch scored highly in all goal categories, except economic development where it’s scores were mixed.
    •	Alternative 2: Bus Rapid Transit in Median from the Future Innovation Center @ Brentwood to Antioch scored highly in equitable access and future transit investments, scored poorly in user experience, and had mixed scores in the three remaining categories.
    •	Alternative 3: Bus Rapid Transit from the Future Innovation Center @ Brentwood to Pittsburg / Bay Point had mixed scores for all six goals.
    •	Alternative 4: Express Bus from the Future Innovation Center at Brentwood to Antioch scored highly in economic development and communicate benefits and tradeoffs, scored poorly  in future transit investments, and received mixed scores in the three remaining categories.
    •	Alternative 5: Express Bus from the Future Innovation Center at Brentwood to Pittsburg / Bay Point scored highly in user experience and communicate benefits and tradeoffs, scored poorly in equitable access and future transit investments, and had mixed scores in the two remaining categories. 
    •	Alternative 6a: Rapid Bus on Lone Tree/Heidom from the Future Innovation Center at Brentwood to Antioch scored well on equitable access, scored poorly on improve air quality, and had mixed scores on the remaining three goals.
    •	Alternative 6b: Rapid Bus on Slatten Ranch from the Future Innovation Center at Brentwood to Antioch scored poorly on improve air quality, improve air quality, and communicate benefits and tradeoffs, and had mixed scores on the remaining three goals.
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